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Just Read Local Author CollectionJust Read Local Author Collection<div class="ExternalClass5224D60FA85C41CF8650A365B6CD0439"><h2>​<span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 1">The Just Read Local Author Collection is a curated collection of the best writing from Arizona authors. Works chosen for this collection are offered through the </span></span><a href="https://catalog.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/Search/misc/esources.aspx?target=356" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Greater Phoenix Digital Library</span></span></a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 1">. Access </span></span><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/collection/1131836" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">the entire collection</span></span></a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 1"> now.</span></span> </h2><div><h2><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":240,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"> </span></h2></div><div><h2><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 2">Access selected eBooks and learn more about selected authors below.</span></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></h2></div></div>

 

 

 

 

Explore the collection and discover something new!Explore the collection and discover something new!https://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/images/Local author 600.png140

 

 

Abigail JohnsonAbigail Johnsonhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/johnson-abigailEvery Other Weekend <div class="ExternalClass9522C39734FD4F8CB22D08A2D0F7BC41"><div><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/search?query=abigail+johnson+every+other">Every Other Weekend​</a> by ​Abigail Johnson<br></h2><p>Abigail Johnson was born in Pennsylvania. When she was twelve, her family traded in snowstorms for year-round summers and moved to Arizona. Abigail chronicled the entire cross-country road trip in a purple spiral-bound notebook that she still has, and has been writing ever since. She became a tetraplegic after breaking her neck in a car accidente when she was seventeen, but hasn't let that stop her from bodysurfing in Mexico, writing and directing a high-school production of Cinderella, and riding roller coasters every chance she gets. She is the author of several young adult novels including<em> If I Fix You</em> and <em>Every Other Weekend.</em></p><p><em></em></p><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Every Other Weekend </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">was inspired by an old episode of </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Wonder Years</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> where Kevin falls for a girl he meets on vacation and then has to leave her behind when he comes home. I started wondering about what it might have been like if they’d continued to see each other regularly, but briefly, and forged a relationship that was totally separate from their ‘real’ lives back home. Adam and Jolene’s story evolved radically from that inspiration—they always do—and there were other influences that played a role including </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Eleanor and Park</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> by Rainbow Rowell and my own childhood growing up in Pennsylvania. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">No, none of the characters in </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Every Other Weekend</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> are based on real people. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did you do to write your book?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I had the privilege of growing in Pennsylvania and even based Adam's house after one that I lived in. I have a police officer friend who was a huge resource for some of the scenes near the end of the book, but otherwise, this wasn't a research-intensive book. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Revolution of Birdie Randolph</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> by Brandy Colbert </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">My latest book just came out! It's a face-paced YA thriller called </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Girl on the Run</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What a horrible thought! I'd probably pursue a career in graphic design.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I love my library and constantly have ebooks and audiobooks checked out through the Greater Phoenix Digital Library. I'm also a member of a local author group that meets every other month at the Tempe Public Library.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div></div>johnson-abigail
Amy Carney Amy Carney https://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/carneyParent on Purpose <div class="ExternalClassEB4D2D049E934D5E90C6C61CC3F1E1E4"><h2><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/5742578" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Parent on Purpose</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Amy Carney </span></span>​<br></span></h2><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><br>Amy Carney is a Leadership Parenting Coach, author, and speaker who writes about intentional parenting and family life on her blog </span><a href="https://amycarney.com/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">AmyCarney.com</span></span></a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> as well as for various freelance print and online outlets. Amy started her company, <em>Parent on Purpose</em>, to create content, products and events to better equip and empower moms and dads during the 18-year journey of full-time parenthood. Amy and her husband of 22 years, Keith, are parents to 18-year-old triplet sons, a 16-year-old daughter and a newly adopted 12-year-old son out of the Arizona foster care system. Find out more at amycarney.com</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> .</span><br></p><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Our family returned home to AZ after a 7 month RV journey around the USA and I was being asked to write a book about our epic adventure. But, as I wrote the book turned into </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Parent on Purpose</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> - more about the heart behind our trip and how we ended up in an RV in the first place and what we learned along the way. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I always have a stack of three books by my bed- one to strengthen my faith, my parenting and my business. I prefer non-fiction, but every once in awhile I love a good fiction novel.</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I have a Mom’s journal coming out at the beginning of the year.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do? </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I would most likely communicate as a tv anchor or communicate in another way. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Yes! We take our son to Scottsdale Civic Center almost every weekend for him to check out new books and movies.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div></div>carney
Amy Fellner DominyAmy Fellner Dominyhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/dominyCookiesaurus Rex<div class="ExternalClass9BCAA4BBEFE24317A549FD16A4257811"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/3535499" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Cookiesaurus Rex</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Amy </span><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">Fellner</span><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4"> </span><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">Dominy</span></span> <br><br></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Amy grew up loving to read and figured out at an early age that books were magical and necessary. She started submitting her own stories to be published when she was thirteen. Amy is now the award-winning author of nine books spanning young adult, middle grade, and picture books, including </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Cookiesaurus Rex</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, a Grand Canyon Reader Award winner in 2020 (co-written by Nate Evans). Amy is also an MFA playwright and loves to visit schools and inspire kids to tell their own stories. She lives in Phoenix, Arizona with her husband and a dog who is training them.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">We wanted to write a story that was lighthearted and fun. Our bossy dinosaur appeared one day making demands (as he does), and the story developed from there.</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I like writing for all ages of kids, but it's especially wonderful to connect with the youngest readers--to see that spark, hear their laughter, and hope you're a part of creating a positive relationship with books. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm going back to read picture books I missed growing up. I just read Leo Lionni's </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Frederick</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. What a perfect story for our times. The mice go through a long, dark winter and it's poetry and words that help them get through.  </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If I wasn't a writer, I'd love to work at a bookstore. I'd have a great excuse to do tons of reading and I'd get to share my day with other book lovers.  </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Ironwood is my local library and I used to go there for books quite a lot before COVID. Now, I love the Libby app and I get books from the library system on my eReader. What a great resource--I'd recommend it to everyone. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div>dominy
Barbara MarriottBarbara Marriotthttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/marriottNeptune's Daughters<div class="ExternalClassDAA10CA7FDB9417BA6F47C3B77C7399E"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/5341055" target="_blank">​Neptune's Daughters​</a> by Barbara Marriott<br></h2><p>​</p><p>Barbara Marriott is the author of fourteen books that cover a wide variety of subjects from nonfiction Arizona, New Mexico and United States Navy history, to fictional mysteries that take place in the 1800s west. Her latest is a fiction/nonfiction on historical women pirates titled <em>Neptune’s Daughters: History’s Most Notorious Women</em>. Dr. Marriott has a PhD in cultural anthropology.  </p><h3>What prompted you to write this book?  <br></h3><div>I am intrigued by real nontraditional women, especially historical women, who lived when there were no laws that favored them. The idea of swashing buckling, daring women who sailed the seas a-pirating was too good to pass up.    </div><div><br></div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.? </h3><div>Although these women did live and sail the seas, there was so little verifiable data on some of them that I decided to present the book as fiction.  </div><div><br></div><h3>Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?  </h3><div>The women in the book were all real people and their real names are used.   </div><h3><br></h3><h3>What type of research did you do to write your book?  </h3><div>The research covered books, articles and historical papers and an  internet informational search.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading?  <br></h3><div>Current read: <em>Land of Hope</em>, Wilfred M. McClay   <br></div><div> </div><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? <br></h3><div>My current writing: <em>Talk About Hard Times: Conversations with Women and Children of the Great Depression</em> (working title). Will not be out until late 2021.  </div><h3><br></h3><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do?  <br></h3><div>I’d climb mountains, sail oceans, fight battles against evil and dream, which is what I’m doing now.   </div><h3><br></h3><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </h3><div>My library is the SaddleBrooke Library. I check out books, donate books, and give presentations.  </div><div><br>​<br></div><p><br></p><p><br></p></div>marriott
Beth CatoBeth Catohttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/catoThe Clockwork Dagger<div class="ExternalClassD2015F80133145DA8A7EA31ABA6A7093"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/1514343" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">The Clockwork Dagger</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Beth Cato</span></span> <br></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"> </span></p><p><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Beth Cato hails from Hanford, California, but currently writes and bakes cookies in a lair west of Phoenix, Arizona. She shares the household with a hockey-loving husband, a numbers-obsessed son, and three feline overlords. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">She's the author of </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Clockwork Dagger </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">(a 2015 Locus Award finalist for First Novel) and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Clockwork Crown</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> (an RT Reviewers' Choice Finalist) from Harper Voyager. Her novella </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Wings of Sorrow and Bone</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> was a 2016 Nebula nominee. Her alt-history </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Blood of Earth</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> trilogy includes </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Breath of Earth</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>, </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Call of Fire</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Roar of Sky</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I wrote the book I always wanted to read but could never find! I've had a thing for magical healers since I was a kid. They often had a role in fantasy novels, but always as a sidekick, never the lead character.  </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracted you to the fantasy genre? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I want magic to exist. Through my words, I can make it happen. </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">One of the fan-favorite characters in </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Clockwork Dagger</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> is Mrs. Stout, who is inspired by both my grandma and the delightful Mrs. Slocombe from the old British comedy </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Are You Being Served</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>? </em></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>What type of research did you do to write your book?</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><em> </em><br><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Though my books use healing magic, my heroine, Octavia, is also a skilled doctor on her own. I based my setting and technology on the World War I era, so I read several books on frontline medicine during the conflict.  </span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm reading two books--an advance release copy of </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Terroir of Whiskey</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> by Rob Arnold, and a re-read of an old childhood favorite of mine, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Boxcar Children</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> by Gertrude Chandler Warner. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm always in the middle of various projects, big and small! I don't have any release dates to mention right now, but I encourage people to follow me on social media and to sign up for my newsletter on my site. That's the best way to keep up with the latest--and get lots of free cookie recipes. (I have a food blog called <em>Bready or Not</em>. I post a new recipe on my site every Wednesday!)</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">For me, writing and storytelling are as necessary as breathing.  </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span> <br><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Oh yes, I love my local library! Shout-out to the Coyote branch here in Buckeye. Even though I have a daunting to-read pile at home, I still end up checking out books every few months. I love, love, love the used book sales they hold in March and December, too.</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div>cato
David RichDavid Richhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/richRV the World <div class="ExternalClassDC09B43A3AF14A5A9F8ACDA9715730BA"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/3976304" target="_blank">RV the World ​</a>by David Rich<br></h2><p>​<br></p><div>David Rich was an assistant AG and law professor, retiring in his 40s to become a full-time traveler, living in almost every country on the planet while writing dozens of travel stories. He is also a sailing captain and private pilot. He wrote <em>Myths of the Tribe</em> [get.180g.co], when religion and ethics diverge (Prometheus Books 1993) examined the influence of organized religion on ethics, 2nd ed. 2019. <em>RV the World </em>combines his seventeen-year tour of 170 countries with lots of practical RVing advice. In 2019 David wrote <em>The ISIS Affair</em>, a satire on religion and nationalism in Syria and <em>Scribes of the Tribe</em>, our greatest thinkers on religion and ethics. His latest book is <em>Antelopes, </em>a modern-day<em> Gulliver’s Travels</em>, to be published in November 2020.  <br></div><div><br></div><h3>What prompted you to write this book?  </h3><div>Both <em>Scribes</em> and <em>Myths (of the Tribe) </em>were written in response to travelling the world for decades full time and half time (and a month or two at a time while working) and encountering dozens of interesting religions, which got me to wondering how they can all be infallible, their histories, and peccadilloes.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?  </h3><div>Travelling the world, living in 170 countries out of the 193 in the UN.  </div><div><br></div><h3>Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who? </h3><div>Characters in <em>Antelopes</em> (to be published Nov. 2020) and <em>The ISIS Affair</em> are modeled on great characters I’ve met around the world.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading? </h3><div>Patrick O’Brian, <em>Far Side of the World </em>(second time through this series), and <em>Infinite Jest</em>, David Foster Wallace.  <br></div><h3><br></h3><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? </h3><div><em>Antelopes </em>will be published in Nov. 2020, next month. I’ve begun a world adventure autobiography, which I may or may not publish.  </div><h3><br></h3><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do? </h3><div>Writing is my second career after retiring from the law (Lewis and Roca, a Phoenix law firm now merged half a dozen times with another name now, had the Miranda case; faculty, ASU College of Law; Judge pro tem, Maricopa County Superior Court; Arizona Attorney General, Asst. Chief Counsel, Civil Division; retired 1993) Other interests are travelling the world, flying, photography, and sailing.  </div><div><br></div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </h3><div>Agave Library, books on writing, fiction, movies.  ​<br></div><p><br></p><p>​<br><br></p></div>rich
Diana DelgadoDiana Delgadohttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/delgado​Tracing the Horse<div class="ExternalClass05FE1E1D7D23429A85419487D7186BF4"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/4817077" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Tracing the Horse</span></span> </a><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Diana Delgado</span> <br></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><br></span></p><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Diana Marie Delgado, Literary Director of the University of Arizona Poetry Center, has more than twenty years of experience working in not-for-profits that advance social justice and the arts. She has worked at a range of organizations, including The Clinton Foundation, Coalition for Hispanic Family Services, and now the University of Arizona Poetry Center. A published poet, her first collection, <em>Tracing the Horse</em>, was a New York Times Noteworthy Pick and follows the coming-of-age of a young Mexican-American woman trying to make sense of who she is amidst a family and community weighted by violence and addiction. Her chapbook, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Late-Night Talks with Men I Think I Trust</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, was the 2018 Center for Book Arts winner and she has published poetry in </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Ploughshares</em>, <em>Ninth Letter</em>, <em>New York Times Magazine</em>, <em>Colorado Review</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Tin House</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. Her literary interests are rooted in her experiences growing up Chicana in the San Gabriel Valley of Southern California. She has extensive experience working both in and with communities of color, after spending more than a decade working and writing in New York City. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span><br><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"></span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Delgado, the first in her family to graduate high school and attend college, transferred from community college to UC Riverside, where she received her bachelor’s degree in Creative Writing, with an emphasis in Poetry. She possesses a Master of Fine Arts from Columbia University and her selected honors and awards include grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, Hedgbrook, and Breadloaf. She is a CORO leadership fellow and member of the Iyengar Foundation. A playwright as well, Delgado had directed plays at both INTAR and La MaMa. She is a member of the CantoMundo and Macondo writing communities.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book? </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I didn't plan to write about my family. My process is to generate free-writes and then cull what I find interesting, or has a tail. And what kept coming up was my family. In some way the book summoned me.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">All this began with a poem that I read from Lorna Dee Cervantes, "The Poet is Served Her Papers." I read that poem and that poem was mirror for me and my feelings. I just felt an instinctual pull to move in that direction. To be a poet, whatever that means.  </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">The book is my life story. I didn't know when I began writing poetry that's what I was attempting to do. The cover of the book is a picture of my parents and me at the plaza in downtown Los Angeles after I was baptized. The book is comprised of my family and me navigating a great deal of trauma in a Mexican-American / Chicano community in Southern California. So yes, real people, real emotions, real challenges.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did you do to write your book?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">No formal research. But I did listen a lot--and that's a form of research. And I relied a lot on memory, which is an archive. I am very interested in idiom and the psychology of the people I write about, including myself. I did read a lot of Freud and Lacan; the idea of subtext and the subconscious is part of how I craft poetry.  </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm currently reading </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>White Tears / Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. It's been an important book for me in that it has helped me understand the microagressions that occur in the workplace and the world; why they are happening, and what this behavior is rooted in. As a woman of color you are often asked to edit yourself for the sake of others. This book is teaching me not to.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm working on a collection of inter-related short-stories that might be a novel and a prose poem collection rooted in the Aztec Conquest. Not sure when I'll be able to share these new projects, but I'm excited to be with these two projects for as long as they need. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I would be a landscape designer. That's what I had begun to study at Mt. San Antonio College before poetry hijacked my life. To me this means that I'd be a visual artist.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm all about the Pima County Library System, and the best library in the world--the UA Poetry Center Library in Tucson, Arizona!</span> ​<br></p></div></div>delgado
Dr. Sally GoldbergDr. Sally Goldberghttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/goldbergFun Baby Learning Games <div class="ExternalClass79452806032141B981FD48FFD595D783"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/3920493" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Fun Baby Learning Games</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Dr. Sally Goldberg</span></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"> <br><br></span></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Sally Goldberg, Ph.D., professor of education, author, magazine writer, and the first parenting expert on FOX TV's "Parent to Parent," has changed her focus! Meet Dr. Sally now on “Parenting with Dr. Sally” </span><a href="http://www.earlychildhoodnews.net/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">www.earlychildhoodnews.net</span></span></a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> for up-to-date parenting information and answers to many</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="IT-IT"> questions.</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> See featured her newest and award-winning book </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Fun Baby Learning Games</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> published in June 2018 by Gryphon House. It highlights eight ages and stages from birth to three and explains 25 activities that promote development for each one. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">With seven out of eight parenting books behind her, Dr. Sally is now writing for children. Her specialty areas range from board and toddler to ages three to five.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Sally worked for many years as an instructor of early childhood education on the adjunct faculties of Nova Southeastern University, Barry University, and the University of Phoenix. Well-known for her tools and strategies for self-esteem development, she was a national conference presenter and a frequent guest on TV and radio. Sally, who grew up in White Plains, NY, has Bachelor's and Master's degrees from Cornell University and a Ph.D. from the University of Miami. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?  </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">This book represents the culmination of years of study and had been in the works for a long time. After a recent delay I finally got back to it and finished it up quickly. Now it is my pleasure to have this easy-to-follow user-friendly guidance available for parents.</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did you do to write your book? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I did the main research many years ago while getting my doctorate in early childhood education. That is when I learned about the five areas of development—cognitive, motor, social, language and self-esteem and how important they are for young children. Then while working as a professor of education, I collected even more information including having the opportunity to try out </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">many different kinds of activities. Last, when writing the book, the editor requested referencing studies to back up each of the 200 suggested activities, and then I provided those. Now there is a  well-researched resource for parents and their infants, toddlers and two-year-olds to enjoy together. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></h3></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I am writing my eighth and last book. It is called <em>The Mind, Body and Spirit of Parenting: Everyday, All Day, 365 Days a Year</em>, and it is currently being reviewed by several different publishers.  </span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Designing educational materials was always in the plan. I started that as a </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">first grade teacher. However, the big change came when my daughter was born with a developmental delay. Then I used my first grade teaching background to figure out how to teach babies. In the end it was her success with learning the colors, letters, numbers, shapes and reading by the time she was two that attracted the attention of many parents and eventually led to my becoming a parenting specialist focusing on the first three years. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I used to use my local library to run a Scrabble group. We met monthly at the one in Fountain Hills.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div>goldberg
Jan CleereJan Cleerehttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/cleereNever Don't Pay Attention: The Life of Rodeo Photographer Louise L. Serpa<div class="ExternalClassECBB74A990824A26805F623385A86F3B"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/2386802" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Never Don't Pay Attention: The Life of Rodeo Photographer Louise L. Serpa</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Jan </span><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">Cleere</span></span> </h2><div class="OutlineElement Ltr BCX9 SCXW139594733" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:visible;cursor:text;clear:both;direction:ltr;color:#000000;font-family:"segoe ui", "segoe ui web", arial, verdana, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><p class="Paragraph SCXW139594733 BCX9" role="heading" aria-level="4" style="margin-bottom:0px;padding:0px;font-style:italic;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;color:#2f5496;"><span data-contrast="none" class="TextRun EmptyTextRun SCXW139594733 BCX9" lang="EN-US" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;color:#00485b;font-weight:bold;font-style:normal;font-size:13pt;font-family:"helvetica neue", "helvetica neue_msfontservice", sans-serif;line-height:22.6625px;"></span><span class="EOP SCXW139594733 BCX9" data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:13pt;line-height:22.6625px;font-family:"helvetica neue", "helvetica neue_msfontservice", sans-serif;color:#00485b;"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Award-winning writer, historian, and lecturer Jan Cleere has just released her sixth historical nonfiction book, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Military Wives in Arizona Territory: A History of Women Who Shaped the Frontier</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, detailing the lives of women who came west with their military husbands in the mid to late 1800s. Combining the words of these women with original research and tracing their movements from camp to camp, Jan explores the tragedies and triumphs they experienced. Her other books include </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Never Don’t Pay Attention: The Life of Rodeo Photographer Louise L. Serpa</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, winner of the 2016 New Mexico/Arizona Book Awards for best Arizona biography and best Arizona book;<em> Levi’s & Lace: Arizona Women Who Made History</em>, 2012 finalist for the New Mexico-Arizona Book Awards; <em>Amazing Girls of Arizona: True Stories of Young Pioneers</em>, Arizona Book Publishing Association Glyph award for best young adult nonfiction, and one of the best books of 2009;<em> Outlaw Tales of Arizona</em>, 2007 winner of the National Federation of Press Women's Literary Competition for Historical Nonfiction; and <em>More Than Petticoats: Remarkable Nevada Women</em>, 2006 WILLA Literary Award Finalist. The Nevada Women's History Project elected Jan to its Roll of Honor for her significant contribution in the preservation of Nevada's women history. The second edition of <em>More Than Petticoats</em>, renamed <em>Nevada’s Remarkable Women</em>, was released in 2015. She is also featured in three anthologies: </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Skirting Traditions: Arizona Women Writers and Journalists 1912-2012</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">; </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Wise Women: Remarkable Stories of Native American Trailblazers</em>; </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">and</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> <em>Badasses of the Old West</em>.</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> Jan also writes a monthly column, “Western Women,” for Tucson’s </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Arizona Daily Star</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> newspaper, recounting the lives of some of Arizona’s early amazing women. Her freelance work appears in national and regional publications.  </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div>cleere
Jeffrey J. MariotteJeffrey J. Mariottehttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/mariotteMissing White Girl: a dark thriller<div class="ExternalClass5348CB0A2311449BB2D04D70742304F9"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/4816574" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Missing White Girl: a dark thriller</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Jeffrey J. Mariotte</span></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"> <br><br></span></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Jeffrey Mariotte has written more than fifty books, including supernatural thrillers </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>River Runs Red</em>, <em>Missing White Girl</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Cold Black Hearts</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, horror epic </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Slab</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, and the teen horror quartet </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Year of the Wicked</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. Other works include the acclaimed thrillers </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Empty Rooms</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Devil’s Bait</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, and—with his wife and writing partner Marsheila (Marcy) Rockwell—the science fiction thriller </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>7 Sykos</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em> and </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Mafia III: Plain of Jars</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, the authorized prequel to the hit video game, as well as shorter works. He has also written novels set in the worlds of </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Star Trek, CSI, NCIS, Narcos, Deadlands, 30 Days of Night, Spider-Man, Conan, Buffy the Vampire Slayer</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Angel</em>,</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> and more. Three of his novels have won Scribe Awards for Best Original Novel, presented by the International Association of Media Tie-In Writers. He’s also won the Inkpot Award from the San Diego Comic-Con, is a co-winner of the Raven Award from the Mystery Writers of America, and has been a finalist for the Bram Stoker Award from the Horror Writers Association, the International Horror Guild Award, the Spur Award from the Western Writers of America, and the Peacemaker Award from the Western Fictioneers. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">He is also the author of many comic books and graphic novels, including the original Western series </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Desperadoes</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, the horror series </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Fade to Black</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, action-adventure series </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Garrison</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, and the original graphic novel </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Zombie Cop</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">He has worked in virtually every aspect of the book business, as a bookstore manager and owner, VP of Marketing for Image Comics/WildStorm, Senior Editor for DC Comics/WildStorm, and Editor-in-Chief for IDW Publishing. When he’s not writing, reading, or editing something, he’s probably out enjoying the desert landscape around the Arizona home he shares with his family and dog and cats.  </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">When I wrote </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Missing White Girl</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, I was living on forty acres about ten miles outside of Douglas, Arizona. This was in the mid-2000s, when illegal border crossings were numerous, and vigilante groups were forming and coming to the border, armed and seemingly eager for action. It was a strange time to be living near the border, and I decided to research the various issues and write a supernatural thriller about them. </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Missing White Girl</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> explores various aspects of border life, from both sides.  </span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I've always been a bit of a genre-blender. As a bookseller I had to read in multiple genres, and I enjoy many of them, so I write in multiple genres as well--sometimes in a single book. </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Missing White Girl </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">contains aspects of a police procedural/thriller--there's a kidnapped girl, a murdered family, and a missing (non-white) girl, and a Cochise County sheriff's officer investigating some of these crimes. But there are also strong elements of supernatural horror in the book as well. The border can be a surreal place, so why not treat it that way? </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did you do to write your book? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">To research the book, I read extensively on border issues and border patrol issues. I spoke to the public information officer for the Cochise County Sheriff's office to get background information on that aspect. I went on a ride-along at the border with a Border Patrol agent and a local journalist, who I also pressed for background details. I spent time at the border, and roamed the streets of Douglas, talking to people who live at the border and often have family and friends on both sides of the line.</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm currently reading </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>American Predator</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, a true-crime account of the serial killer Israel Keyes. I'm also doing research for my current project. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">in the midst of revisions on a historical epic set during the California gold rush. No idea when it will come out--sometime after it's finished. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Since 1980, I've made my living from books and words and stories, in one way or another. My current day job is doing editing for an online legal education site. I've also been a technical editor for a defense contractor, and worked in publishing and bookselling for years, so whatever I do, it still involves using the English language.</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">My local library is the Queen Creek branch. During the pandemic, I haven't been using it, but typically I scour its shelves for research materials whenever I'm gearing up for a new project. I also paw through the books for sale, and sometimes contribute my own books to that effort.​</span></p></div></div>mariotte
Joanna Ruth MeyerJoanna Ruth Meyerhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/meyerEcho North <div class="ExternalClassA8CB5DFB269E437DBB371B505D79ABFA"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/search?query=echo+north+meyer" target="_blank">​​Echo North</a> by Joanna Ruth Meyer​<br></h2><p><br></p><p>Joanna Ruth Meyer is the author of the critically-acclaimed <em>Echo North</em>, as well as the companion novel duology <em>Beneath The Haunting Sea</em> and <em>Beyond The Shadowed Earth</em>, and the fairytale-inspired Into <em>The Heartless Wood</em>. She writes stories about fierce teens finding their place in the world, fighting to change their fate, save the ones they love, or carve out a path to redemption.  </p><div><br></div><div>Joanna lives with her dear husband and son, a rascally feline, and an enormous grand piano named Prince Imrahil in Mesa, Arizona. As often as she can, she escapes the desert heat and heads north to the mountains, where the woods are always waiting.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What prompted you to write this book?  </h3><div><em>Echo North</em> actually started with a dream I had about a girl getting chased across the ice by a pack of wolves, and when I sat down to brainstorm it, I realized it wanted to be an "East of the Sun and West of the Moon" retelling. </div><div> <br></div><div><br></div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.? </h3><div>Fantasy is my favorite genre to read and to write, and I’ve always loved fairytale retellings—it was such a challenge and an honor to get to write one! </div><div><br></div><h3>Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who? </h3><div>They are not. :)  </div><div><br></div><h3>What type of research did you do to write your book? </h3><div><em>Echo North</em> is set in a pseudo 19th-century Siberia, so I read up on clothing and food, as well as looked at lots of gorgeous and inspiring pictures of the Siberian landscape.  </div><h3><br></h3><h3>What book are you currently reading? </h3><div>I just finished Megan Whalen Turner’s <em>Return of the Thief</em>, and R.J. Anderson’s upcoming <em>Torch</em>, and am debating what to start next from my toppling TBR pile. </div><div><br></div><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? </h3><div>I am currently working on a companion novel to <em>Echo North</em>, titled <em>Wind Daughter </em>and set to come out in 2022.  </div><div><br></div><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do? <br></h3><div>I’d love to be an indie singer/songwriter!  </div><div><br></div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </h3><div>In non-pandemic times, I love taking my young son to the Tempe Public Library! I also read lots of ebooks from the Greater Phoenix Digital Library!  </div><div><br><br></div><p><br></p></div>meyer
Jon TaltonJon Taltonhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/taltonThe Bomb Shelter <div class="ExternalClass37BC829D04514D969D6FD4C599289018"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/3784637" target="_blank">​The Bomb Shelter​</a> by Jon Talton​<br></h2><p>​<br></p><div>Fourth-generation Arizonan Jon Talton is the author of 13 novels and one work of history. These include the Phoenix-based David Mapstone Mysteries, the Cincinnati Casebooks, and the thriller <em>Deadline Ma</em>n. He’s starting a new series following a 1930s Phoenix private detective, with the first novel, <em>City of Dark Corners</em>, due in the spring of 2021.    <br></div><div><br></div><div>The Mapstone mystery <em>Dry Heat </em>was named the best work of fiction for 2005 by Arizona Highways magazine. <em>High Country Nocturne </em>won the 2016 Spotted Owl Award from the Friends of Mystery. His first novel, <em>Concrete Desert</em>, was called “more intelligent and rewarding than most contemporary mysteries” by the <em>Washington Post</em>. The New York Journal of Books called <em>South Phoenix Rules</em>, “A haunting noir story vividly rendered by Talton’s white-hot prose…original…impressively unyielding.”  </div><div><br></div><div>Talton is a veteran journalist, having worked in San Diego, Denver, Dayton, Cincinnati, Charlotte, as well as being a columnist for the <em>Arizona Republic</em>. At the <em>Dayton Daily News</em>, he led a team that produced the nation’s first computer-assisted investigation into OSHA. It was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Public Service. The section he led at the <em>Charlotte Observer</em> was named Best in Business nationally by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers and won several Society of Newspaper Designers awards. He is now a columnist for the <em>Seattle Times</em>. He also writes the Phoenix-centric blog Rogue Columnist and is frequently quoted as a Phoenix historian.    <br></div><div><br></div><div>Before journalism, Talton spent five years as an EMT-paramedic, much of it in the inner city of Phoenix. He was also an instructor in theater at Southeastern Oklahoma State University. Talton studied theater and history at Arizona State University and history at Miami University of Ohio. He completed a Knight fellowship at the University of Southern California.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What prompted you to write this book?  </h3><div>It was a fictionalization of the lethal 1976 bombing of <em>Arizona Republic</em> reporter Don Bolles, using my character David Mapstone and the Mapstone mystery ensemble of regular characters. Based on extensive interviews with detectives who worked the case, I wanted to use fiction to provide a likely explanation for what actually happened in real life.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.? </h3><div>I enjoyed reading mysteries by the likes of Raymond Chandler when I was younger. As naive as it sounds, I wanted to "sell out," write a mystery that would make a ton of money, then leave journalism and write "serious fiction." Alas, I never made that much money. As for non-fiction, I was trained as a historian.  </div><div><br></div><h3>Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who? </h3><div>Phoenix is the realest character in the Mapstone novels, my equivalent of Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles. Sheriff Peralta was based on a friend, who has passed away. When I showed him the Concrete Desert manuscript, he said, "I love this, it's fantastic! But I hate this guy Peralta."  </div><div><br></div><h3>What type of research did you do to write your book?  </h3><div>Often I do minimal research because I know my cities and their locations and history well. But, as stated above, I did extensive research for <em>The Bomb Shelter</em>. This included hours of interviews with the detectives who investigated the Don Bolles murder.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading?  </h3><div>Like David Mapstone, I love history. I'm reading S. C. Gwynne's superb <em>Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson</em>.  </div><div><br></div><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? </h3><div>I have another book due in two years. But the pandemic has thrown the publishing industry into chaos. </div><div><br></div><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do?  </h3><div>If I were smart, I would be a CPA. But I always wanted to serve. So I might have remained a paramedic or stayed as a college instructor (maybe a full professor by now). I considered getting my Ph.D in history but my graduate adviser warned me that I wrote too clearly to be an academic historian (true story).  </div><div><br></div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?  </h3><div>In Phoenix, I patronize the Burton Barr Central Library, designed by my friend Will Bruder. In Seattle, I use the Seattle Central Library (I wrote The Pain Nurse at a table on the sixth floor). ​<br></div><p><br></p></div>talton
Kara McDowellKara McDowellhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/mcdowellOne Way or Another<div class="ExternalClassA7B943889A4748C4BF5A4E8B4D1B1105"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/search?query=echo+north+meyer" target="_blank">​One Way or Another​ ​</a>by Kara McDowell ​<br></h2><p><br></p><p><em></em></p><div><div>Born in the mountains and raised in the desert, Kara McDowell spent her childhood swimming, boating, and making up stories in her head. Now she lives in Mesa, Arizona, where she divides her time between writing, baking, and playing board games with her husband and three young sons.   </div><h3><br></h3><h3>What prompted you to write this book?  </h3><div>I’ve dealt with anxiety for most of my life and I knew I wanted to write a book about a girl who has the same struggles I do. Specifically, my main character Paige struggles to make decisions. I thought it would be fun to give her a difficult decision and then follow through with the <em>Sliding Doors</em> set-up and show the outcome of each possible choice. I wanted to highlight the realities of living with anxiety while also sending Paige on a grand, romantic adventure filled with joy. Everyone deserves a happy ending, regardless of their mental health struggles.   <br></div><div><br></div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?  </h3><div><em>One Way or Another</em> is a contemporary Young Adult rom-com. I’m attracted to YA novels because the teenage years are so full of possibility. A 17-year-old girl is just beginning to figure out her place in the world and she has an entire, exciting future ahead of her. I especially love writing romances because the feeling of young love (often first love) is so big and intense that it’s an emotion anyone can tap into and remember. I remember the rush of falling in love for the first time, and it’s a feeling I’d happily live again and again through my books!   </div><h3><br></h3><h3>What type of research did you do to write your book?  </h3><div>It was important to me to accurately portray generalized anxiety disorder. Even though I’ve lived with anxiety for years, I researched symptoms and coping techniques to ensure that the mental health representation in the book is truthful and responsible. The book was also read by a mental health professional before publication to ensure that Paige’s diagnosis is consistent with her behavior.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading?  </h3><div>I’m reading <em>Majesty</em> by Katharine McGee. It’s the sequel to last year’s <em>American Royals </em>(a reimagining of American with a royal family) and it’s pure fun!  </div><div><br></div><div>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?  </div><div>I’m working on another YA contemporary rom-com with Scholastic! It is scheduled to release in early 2022.  </div><div><br></div><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do?  </h3><div>That’s a tough question to answer, because writing has been my dream job since I was a kid! That said, I’d want a job that allowed me to travel while also allowing me to work from home and spend time with my kids. I’m not sure what job that would be, which is why I’m so happy to have the career I do! Writing is a dream come true in so many ways.  </div><div><br></div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?  </h3><div>I use my local library all the time. I’m a member of the Maricopa County Library system and I love the Libby app for reading eBooks and listening to audiobooks! I’m also a mom of three young readers and the library has been an amazing way to bring children’s books into my home.  </div><div> <br></div><br></div><div> <br></div><p><br></p></div>mcdowell
Karen SchalerKaren Schalerhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/schalerChristmas Ever After<div class="ExternalClassB615CE44C29F4C1FA555C266E28ABEA6"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/5701865" target="_blank">Christmas Ever After​</a> by Karen Schaler<br></h2><p>​<br></p><div>Karen Schaler is a three-time Emmy award-winning storyteller, author, screenwriter, journalist, and national TV host. Karen worked as a reporter and fill-in anchor at ABC15 in Phoenix. In 2007, Karen was the first journalist in the world ever embedded with an Apache helicopter unit in Afghanistan, and that unit was the Arizona National Guard’s 285th Aviation Unit. In just the last three years Karen has written original Christmas movies for Netflix, Hallmark, and Lifetime, including the Netflix sensation <em>A Christmas Prince</em>, and four Christmas books, <em>Christmas Ever After</em>, <em>Christmas Camp</em>, <em>Christmas Camp Wedding</em> and <em>Finding Christmas</em>, earning her the nickname in the press "Christmas Karen." After Karen wrote the <em>Christmas Camp</em> movie for Hallmark, and her <em>Christmas Camp </em>books, she created a real-life Christmas Camp® for grown-ups at The Phoenician Resort in Scottsdale, where she carefully curates and hosts magical Christmas activities from her movies and books. Karen is now doing virtual Christmas Camps all around the world, to help share some holiday joy and happiness during this challenging time. All of Karen's stories are uplifting and filled with heart and hope.  </div><div> </div><h3>What prompted you to write this book? <br></h3><div>After I wrote the Hallmark original movie <em>Christmas Camp </em>in 2018, I then wrote my books, <em>Christmas Camp</em> and <em>Christmas Camp Wedding</em>. I know that’s different from what most people expect as usually books are adapted to movies. I loved the <em>Christmas Camp </em>concept so much I created real-life Christmas Camps for adults, my first one at The Phoenician resort in Scottsdale, Arizona.  At last year’s Christmas Camp I told my Christmas Campers about writing this book and in one of my Christmas Karen Chats my campers helped give me great ideas for romantic dates and Christmas actives that I could include in the novel. I did this as fun, festive research because I do the same thing in <em>Christmas Ever After</em> where Riley has the Christmas Campers help her come up with ideas. The only difference is I love all things Christmas and Riley has a journey to go on before she can let Christmas back into her heart.   </div><div><br></div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.? </h3><div>My earliest memory is of my mom and grandma reading sweet romance novels, so it was the first thing I started reading as well. My whole family has always loved heartwarming, uplifting stories. My grandma is also the one who taught me to love libraries. She got all her book at the library and read every single day. She lived to be a 104 and reading was her favorite pastime. She also volunteered at a local library well into her 90s.   </div><div><br></div><h3>Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who? </h3><div>Of all my books, <em>Christmas Ever After</em> is the one that is most inspired by people in my own life, especially when I write about Riley’s three ex-boyfriends. I drew inspiration from some of the special men who have been in my life. While all the details were changed, the idea was there that like my past loves all the ex-boyfriends in <em>Christmas Ever After</em> were very unique, special, and very lovable in their own way.   </div><div><br></div><h3>What type of research did you do to write your book? </h3><div>In <em>Christmas Ever After</em> I wanted to have an eco-friendly component so that’s something I researched and then my recipes and activities I always research and experiment with first before including in all my books. My Christmas cookie recipes are always my favorite kind of research!   </div><div><br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading? <br></h3><div>While I usually enjoy reading the same kinds of books that I wrote, uplifting romance I’ve been reading a lot of screenplays as I’m writing my next feature film and it’s the best way to learn. I’m also reading <em>Aristotle’s Poetics</em>, written around 330 BC, after I heard legendary screenwriter Aaron Sorkin recommend it to help with screenwriting. He was right! If you’re a writer this can help with any kind of storytelling and could be the best 60 pages you ever read.    </div><div><br></div><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? </h3><div>I write every single day. I’m currently working on my next Christmas novel that will come out in 2021, next Christmas. I’m also in development for my next Christmas movie also slated to come out in 2021, and I’m working on two spec scripts, a Christmas feature and a Summer romcom, that I’ll also write the novels for. This is in addition to writing my ongoing Travel Therapy TV segments that air nationally and internationally.    </div><div><br></div><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do? </h3><div>I honestly can’t imagine not being a writer, but if I had to do something else I think I would be a movie director because I would still be telling stories, and also a photographer because I do some photography now and love it.   </div><div><br></div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </h3><div>I’ve been traveling with my travel show for the last ten years to more than 68 countries so I haven’t had the pleasure to have a library I call home. I’ve been living in New York City and Scottsdale, Arizona, but honestly I say my home is wherever I put my suitcase. I hope to someday have a library to call home ,but right now I visit any library I can, no matter where I go, as that has become part of my travel tradition.   ​<br></div><p><br></p><p><br></p></div>schaler
Katrina ShawverKatrina Shawverhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/shawverHenry <div class="ExternalClass4FED394EF008456A99D01C1C11B79DDE"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/search?query=henry+katrina" target="_blank">​Henry​</a> by Katrina Shawver<br></h2><p><br></p><div>Katrina Shawver is a writer, experienced public speaker, and history geek. She wrote for the <em>Arizona Republic</em> newspaper for eleven years. During that time, she met Henry Zguda, a Polish Catholic survivor of German concentration camps, and soon offered to write his incredible story.   </div><div> </div><div>In 2018 The Polish American Congress - Arizona division awarded Katrina their Polish Heritage Award for “her contribution to the documentation of the suffering inflicted on Polish people during the Holocaust.” She is a Road Scholar for Arizona Humanities, the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities for 2019-2021 and served as the Writer in Residence for the Glendale Public Library. Additionally, her book garnered First Place for Published Nonfiction in the 2018 Arizona Authors Association Literary Contest. </div><div><br></div><div>Katrina has answered phones for a forensic psychiatrist, ridden in a hot air balloon, hiked the Grand Canyon three times, and lost her car keys more times than she can count. She still dreams of the day sweet potato fries count as a vegetable. A reader at heart, she loves curling up with a good book and a glass of Merlot by her side. She lives in Phoenix, Arizona. </div><h3><br></h3><h3>What prompted you to write this book? <br></h3><div>Pure instinct. The story came to me unexpectedly and stayed with me for reasons I cannot explain. I met Henry Zguda through a phone tip. He was eighty-five-years-old, with no one to leave his stories of Auschwitz and World War II to. Soon after we met, I offered to write his story, and we became close friends. I became determined to tell a story that represented a less-recognized portion of history in this country – that of Poland and Poles during World War II. The story called to me and the right people came into my life at the right time. He died a year after we met, so it was meant to be.   </div><div><br></div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?    <br></h3><div>I am drawn to nonfiction, or historical novels based on true events. History is our culture - part of who we are and where we came from. When I am writing, real life is often crazier than anything I could dream up. As someone fascinated by people, I was always drawn to biographies. Through those books I learned about Harriet Tubman, Helen Keller, the Von Trapp Family singers, Anne Frank, and so many others. Even the <em>Little House on the Prairi</em><em>e</em> books I read as a child are stories based on the author’s life. I have always had this sense that history is about people, not dates and battles - what they experienced, how they survived, and what they endured. Unless written down, their stories will be lost.  <br></div><div><br></div><h3>Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who? <br></h3><div>My book is WWII nonfiction. Everyone in <em>Henry</em> are real people.  </div><div><br></div><h3>What type of research did you do to write your book? </h3><div>The burden of proof and accuracy in nonfiction is especially non-negotiable, just as when I wrote for the newspaper. In my case, I began with almost no knowledge of Poland, Polish history, or the details and intricacies of what it meant to be a survivor of a concentration camp, especially from the perspective of prisoners outside the category of Jewish. It took years of reading similar memoirs, texts, researching photo archives, and even travel to Poland and Germany to verify information. I came across original documents in German, French, and Polish. A significant part of the research included translation of dozens of documents, including 130 original documents from Auschwitz and Buchenwald concentration camps. </div><div><br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading? <br></h3><div><em>The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek</em> by Kim Michele Richardson. Next I will read <em>The Giver of Stars: A Novel</em> by Jojo Moyes. Both novels are based on pack horse librarians in 1930s Kentucky.  </div><h3><br></h3><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? </h3><div>I still blog on my website and write in short form on various writing websites. I’m still looking for the next great survivor story. I have several ideas I am working through, but none to announce at this time.  </div><h3><br></h3><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do? </h3><div>Few people are only writers including me. Through outside lives we all bring those experiences and views to our writing. The question is more what else would I do in addition to writing? In addition to writing and blogging, I have worked in software support, as a paralegal, tax preparation, and answered phones for a forensic psychiatrist. Today, in addition to writing, I am actively pursuing items on my “bucket list,” especially now that my children are adults. Life is short, so I want to experience as much as I can. Professionally, I think being a librarian, or a high school history teacher, and sharing a passion for literacy and access to information would be rewarding and worthwhile.  <br></div><div><br></div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </h3><div>I have been a Friend of the Phoenix Public Library since 1993 and love to support other local libraries. I can often be found using the Ironwood branch, near my home in Ahwatukee. I also love how many resources are available through every library’s website.   ​<br></div><p><br></p></div>shawver
Kelly deVosKelly deVoshttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/devos​Day Zero<div class="ExternalClass2928D972BB1D46588566EB6359B78F1F"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/search?query=day+zero+devos" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Day Zero</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Kelly </span><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">deVos</span></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"> </span></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><br>Kelly deVos is from Gilbert, Arizona, where she lives with her high school sweetheart husband, amazing teen daughter and superhero dog, Cocoa. She holds a B.A. in Creative Writing from Arizona State University. When not reading or writing, Kelly can typically be found with a mocha in hand, bingeing the latest TV shows and adding to her ever-growing sticker collection.  </span> <br></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Kelly’s work has been featured in the </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">New York Times</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> as well as on </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Vulture, Salon, Bustle</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">SheKnows</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. Her debut novel, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Fat Girl on a Plane</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, was named one of the “50 Best Summer Reads of All Time” by </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Reader’s Digest</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> magazine. Her second book,</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> <em>Day Zero</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, is now available from Inkyard Press/HarperCollins. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I’ve always been interested in girls and women performing and existing in traditionally male-dominated spaces, so I wanted to write about a female coder. I also wanted to dive into how teens deal with and interact with political systems, so </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Day Zero</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> tries to tackle that in an exciting way. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">As a reader, I love thrillers – books that make me want to keep turning pages and stay up just a little bit later. It felt natural for me to try to write in that genre. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Most of the characters are </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">pretty fictional. My husband, a software developer, helped me quite a bit with the perspective of Dr. Charles Maxwell so I think that he might be the closest character with a real-life inspiration. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did you do to write your book?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I did a ton of research especially about coding and prepper culture. I did an online code camp to help me with some of the computer science concepts in the book. I tested tons of self-heating meals like the kinds my characters eat when they are on the run. I tried to teach myself about basic survivalism, like building a campfire and treating basic injuries. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I am currently reading</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> <em>All Eyes on Her</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> by L.E. Flynn. It’s a page-turner of a young adult thriller that is about a seventeen-year-old girl, Tabby, accused of murdering her boyfriend on a camping trip. It’s written from several perspectives, including Tabby’s best friend, her enemy and her ex-boyfriend letting the reader explore the crime from every point of view besides Tabby’s. I totally recommend it! </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">The sequel to </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Day Zero</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, called </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Day One</em>,</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> will be released in December. I’m currently putting the finishing touches on </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Eat Your Heart Out</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, a YA horror/thriller that follows six disgruntled teens forced to spend two weeks at fat camp during the worst blizzard in a century, only to find that camp is even worse than they expected because it's crawling with zombies. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">My day job is working as a graphic designer which I also really enjoy! </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">My local library is the Southeast Regional Library in Gilbert. I love it there! I often work with writer friends in the small conference rooms that can be reserved in two-hour blocks. In addition to a great selection of books, they also have a ton of great programs. One summer I participated in a workshop for teen writers. </span> <br></p></div></div>devos
Liz JohnsonLiz Johnsonhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/johnson-liz​A Dazzle of Diamonds <div class="ExternalClassC46C1D3E5AA1416BB4D47256E66A3435"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/5653135" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">A Dazzle of Diamonds</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Liz Johnson</span></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"> <br><br></span></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">​By day, Liz Johnson works in marketing, and she finds time to write late at night. She’s the author of more than a dozen novels, a New York Times bestselling novella, and a handful of short stories filled with true love and happy endings. Liz makes her home in Phoenix, Arizona where she enjoys theater, exploring local history, and doting on her nieces and nephews.</span><br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">When I visited Savannah, Georgia, several years ago, I fell in love with the city and its history. It’s a city of storytellers, and I loved writing about modern characters exploring history to uncover hope for their futures.</span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I’m a hopeless romantic, and I love writing stories of true love and happy endings. I’m all about tales of hope and inspiration that can help us all through difficult times. </span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></h3></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">All of my characters are fictional, but I do like incorporating characteristics or personality quirks from those I know. My best friend—an event planner extraordinaire—inspired the heroine of <em>A Dazzle of Diamond</em><em>s</em> to be organized, thoughtful, and motivated to check off her to do list. </span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did you do to write your book?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I did a lot of research during my visit to Savannah, walking the historic streets. I was fascinated by the stories of the Union Army arriving in town in December 1864, which is the inspiration for the historical aspect of </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>A Dazzle of Diamonds</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. I studied up on the path of Sherman’s March to the Sea and how the arrival of 60,000 soldiers affected a city of 30,000 residents. I also loved getting to know some of the residents and their affection for their hometown. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I’m currently catching up on my to be read pile after a busy season of writing. First up is </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Joy of Falling</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> by Lindsay Harrel. </span> <br><br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></h3></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I just finished writing my next book—<em>Beyond the Tides</em>—which will release next summer. I’m so excited to invite readers back to Prince Edward Island for a brand-new series about family, forgiveness, and the kind of love that heals all wounds. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">In my day job I’m in marketing, but I’ve always dreamed of working in a library surrounded by books!</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I’ve missed going to the library during the pandemic! The Glendale Library is one of my favorite places. I love going there to browse books and to write in in quiet. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div>johnson-liz
Mirla RazMirla Razhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/razThe Birds Sang Eulogies: a Memoir<div class="ExternalClass585E5ACDB1DE4102A3265E833257F89E"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/5756872" target="_blank">​The Birds Sang Eulogies: a Memoir ​</a>by Mirla Raz<br></h2><p><br></p><div>Ms. Raz is a retired speech pathologist and the author of the popular <em>Help Me Talk Right </em>books <em>How to Teach a Child to Say the “R” Sound</em> <em>in 15 Easy Lessons</em>, <em>How to Teach a Child to Say the “S” Sound in 15 Easy Lessons</em> and<em> How to Teach a Child to Say the “L” Sound in 15 Easy Lessons</em> and <em>Preschool Stuttering: What Parents Can Do</em>. Ms. Raz is also a contributing author in other publications.  </div><div> <br></div><div>Ms. Raz is a past president of the Phoenix Holocaust Survivors’ Association. She is a member of the Board and the Education Chair for the Phoenix Holocaust Association. Ms. Raz newest publication is <em>The Birds Sang Eulogies: A Memoir</em>. The book recounts the harrowing experiences of her parents during WWII as they struggled to survive the Nazi’s attempted extermination of the Jews.  <br></div><div> </div><div>Ms. Raz is married to Zohar Raz. They are the proud parents of two daughters and two grandchildren and one on the way.   <br></div><div> </div><h3>What prompted you to write this book?   <br></h3><div>Originally, I wanted to write down my parents' Holocaust stories so future generations of my family would know their history and what my parents endured. I felt it was important for them to understand how our new roots were generated after the Holocaust. As I got into writing the book, I realized the that what I had written was extremely important for others to know. Even though there are many books on the experiences of Holocaust survivors, each is unique as well.  </div><div> </div><h3>Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?   <br></h3><div>All the characters are real: my parents, my daughter and I.  </div><div> </div><h3>What type of research did you do to write your book?  <br></h3><div>First, I needed to transcribe what my parents described in the videos I had made in the 1990s of their Holocaust testimonies. When I got to the post-war chapters I researched the history of restitution, compensation and reparations for the Holocaust survivors. I knew that it had not been easy for my parents to gain entry into the United States. I wondered about why. That lead me to research that aspect of their post-war lives and the obstacles that the immigration policies of the United States had put in place to limit the number of Jews who would be allowed into our country. Finally, I researched the reception of the Holocaust survivors by the American Jewish community. I think the reader will find the results of my research quite compelling.    </div><div> </div><h3>What book are you currently reading?  <br></h3><div><em>My Future is in America</em>. <br></div><div><br></div><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?   </h3><div>I am in the process of writing a play based on the book. I am not sure when I will complete it.  </div><div> </div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?   <br></h3><div>With COVID I rely on ebooks generally from the Phoenix Library system. </div><div><br>​<br></div><p><br></p><p><br></p></div>raz
Parris SheetsParris Sheetshttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/sheetsWarden's Reign<div class="ExternalClass107640D4BF85461DB25C6A8A2014438C"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/search?query=warden%27s+reign+parris" target="_blank">​Warden's Reign​</a> by Parris Sheets<br></h2><p>​<br></p><div>Parris lives in Mesa, Arizona with her husband and two golden retrievers. She discovered her love for reading when a middle school reading assignment led her to the fantasy section of the library. This passion sparked stories of her own imagination, yet she never put pen to paper until after college. When she's not consumed in her writing, she enjoys Olympic weightlifting, playing Dungeons and Dragons, and coaching color guard. </div><div><br></div><h3>What prompted you to write this book? </h3><div>There was a time after high school when I would go to the bookstore weekly and pick out a new book. After a couple years, the selection of unread epic young adult fantasies grew slim, so I set out to write something I would want to read. </div><div> </div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.? <br></h3><div>Fantasy is by far my favorite genre. I love that the possibilities are only limited by my imagination. I can write my own rules in my own made up world. It is the epitome of freedom. </div><div><br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading? <br></h3><div>I am currently halfway through <em>Midnight Sun</em> by Stephenie Meyer. It’s a guilty pleasure for sure. I read the series back in college, and I couldn’t pass up the new release.  </div><div><br></div><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? </h3><div>I have two projects going at the moment. I am editing <em>Children of the Volcano</em>, which is the sequel to <em>Warden’s Reign</em>, and it is set to release March of 2021. Between those edits, I’m currently just past the halfway point of writing the rough draft for the third installment of the <em>Essence of Ohr</em> series with a 2022 release date.  <br></div><div><br></div><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do? </h3><div>I have a great interest in exercise and working out so I would have pursued a career as a personal trainer if writing wasn’t an option.  </div><div><br></div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </h3><div>My local library is the Mesa Public Library. I have been to both the Main and Red Mountain branches for an extremely helpful tool that I think any aspiring writer should utilize which is the Writer in Residence. This program gives people the opportunity to meet with established authors and ask questions about writing and publishing. They can give feedback on your pages or query or help figure out a plan for seeking out agents and publishers. Often these authors will hold lectures on topics such as tips for convincing dialogue, planning outlines, writing realistic action and so much more. I continue to learn from this program.  ​<br></div><p><br></p><p><br></p></div>sheets
Paul MosierPaul Mosierhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/mosierSummer and July<div class="ExternalClass8DB5A661D2D547919DD49E9E3EFB439E"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/search?query=summer+and+july+mosier" target="_blank">Summer and July </a>by Paul Mosier<br></h2><p>​<br></p><div><p><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}">Paul Mosier began writing novels in 2011 but has written in some fashion his entire life. He is married and the father to two amazing daughters, one of whom passed to the next dimension at the age of 9 in 2018 after a 27 month fight with a rare childhood cancer. He lives near his place of birth in downtown Phoenix, and is proud to call the Burton Barr main library his home branch. He loves listening to baseball on the radio, eating vegetarian food, drinking coffee, and talking nonstop. Perhaps the world’s foremost advocate of the em-dash, he has written three critically acclaimed books for middle grade readers—<em>Train I Ride</em>, <em>Echo’s Siste</em><em>r</em>, and <em>Summer and July</em>. His work had been awarded the ILA Intermediate Fiction Award, a Publishers Weekly Flying Start, Bank Street Best, co-recipient of the Judy Goddard Award with Dusti Bowling, a Junior Library Guild selection, best of the libraries of New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, mock Newberys among librarians, multiple starred reviews, and appears on the reading lists of multiple states. His work has thus far been translated to Dutch, Japanese, Spanish and Italian, and is forthcoming in Farsi and Vietnamese. Don’t ask what he is working on unless you’ve got some free time. He says that he’s just getting started.  </span></p></div><p><br><br></p></div>mosier
Sara FujimuraSara Fujimurahttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/fujimura​Every Reason We Shouldn't<div class="ExternalClass4129E74B87D14740B59EC02B9569B00D"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/search?query=Every%20Reason%20We%20Shouldn%27t" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Every Reason We Shouldn't</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Sara Fujimura</span></span> <span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559738":40,"335559739":0,"335559740":259}"> </span></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><br>Sara Fujimura writes for teens and the young at heart. She is the American half of her Japanese-American family and spends about a month each summer in Japan with her children. So it's no surprise she's written about Japanese culture and raising bicultural kids for such magazines as </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Learning Through History</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Mothering</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, as well as, writing travel-related articles for </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>To Japan with Love</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. Her award-winning YA contemporary novel </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Tanabata Wish</em></span><a href="https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://amzn.to/2sW1il2__%3b%21%21LkjWUF49MRd51_ry%21IxWvZIrfJ67yoSfW4M2lK2XUiIlOTwuvkGV2jGuzwZMK4uKSb_9f8TOgo8yiW1BxMWRjshb8$" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink"> </span></span></a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">is set in Nagoya, Japan. Her second book, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Breathe</em>,</span><a href="https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://amzn.to/2t6eQJT__%3b%21%21LkjWUF49MRd51_ry%21IxWvZIrfJ67yoSfW4M2lK2XUiIlOTwuvkGV2jGuzwZMK4uKSb_9f8TOgo8yiW1BxMVEtqhsl$" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink"> </span></span></a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">is YA historical fiction set against the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic. </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Every Reason We Shouldn't</em></span><a href="https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781250204073__%3b%21%21LkjWUF49MRd51_ry%21IxWvZIrfJ67yoSfW4M2lK2XUiIlOTwuvkGV2jGuzwZMK4uKSb_9f8TOgo8yiW1BxMU97k-XU$" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink"> </span></span></a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">is for fans of </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Cutting Edge</em> </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Yuri on Ice</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. Her third YA contemporary novel </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Faking Reality</em> </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">(Tor Teen, 7/2021) is for fans of </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Some Kind of Wonderful</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> and </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Just for Clicks</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. Sara is a creative writing teacher, literacy advocate, and is excited to support the next generation of authors.</span> <br><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-US"></span> </p><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></h3></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">In 2010, I read Olympic speed skater Apolo Ohno's autobiography </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>No Regrets</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. I was fascinated by the account of his teenage years. Specifically, when Ohno was at the crossroads and wondering if he should quit the sport altogether because his raw talent was no longer enough. Jonah's character came to me first, and Apolo Ohno very much influenced him. Olivia is the one who tells the story though, and I gave the crossroads problem to her. I have two ultra-talented girls (now young women) in my life, and I got to see—thanks to their moms—what it's like to be that one-in-a-million teen and all the unique challenges that come with being that high level of an athlete/performer. One is a dancer and the other a singer, but I wanted a girl who was into ice sports to work better with Jonah's character. As super cheesy as it is, I love </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Cutting Edge</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. I wanted to write an updated (and much more realistic) version of the movie with teen skaters. I also love </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Yuri on Ice</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. Just like Yuri, there is nothing physically wrong with Olivia. She's just lost her spark. That is until Jonah starts training at her family's rink.</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">This is my third book under the young adult umbrella. The thing I love the most about both reading and writing predominately young adult books is the sense of hope they have. That these characters can be hit with all kinds of challenges, and yet their big dream might still come true. Anything is still possible.</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?</span> <br><br></h3></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Speed skater Jonah Choi is very much based on Olympian Apolo Ohno. Olivia Kennedy isn't based on one figure skater in particular. That said, I recently listened to a podcast interview with Olympic medalist Sasha Cohen, and Olivia sounds so much like her that it is scary.</span> </p><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> <br></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did you do to write your book?</span> <br><br></h3></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">So. Much. Research. Across the board. The only thing I came into the project feeling semi-confident about was the roller derby part because I had written a piece for</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> <em>Raising Arizona Kids</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> magazine many years ago about moms who do roller derby. I have a lengthy acknowledgments page in the back of the book thanking all the people who helped me craft these characters who are nothing like me in a lot of ways and then exactly like me in others. The thing that surprised me the most was the very specific rules figure skating has. For example, at the last minute, I had to completely scrap the iconic phoenix-inspired outfit that Olivia had worn in my head for the previous eight years. I was told that Olivia would have been docked points both for her costume and the sparkles decorating her face. Does this make or break the story? No. But like I said, there are some ways I'm very much like Jonah and Olivia (read: I'm a perfectionist.).</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I am waiting on Kara McDowell's newest YA book, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>One Way or Another</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, to come in. An aside: I know Kara in real life, and her last YA book </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Just for Clicks</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> was one of the inspirations for my next book, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Faking Reality</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> (7/2021, Tor Teen).</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I'm always writing and creating (take that COVID!). My next YA contemporary book is called </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Faking Reality</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> and is for fans of the 80s movie </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Some Kind of Wonderful</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. We are in the final edit stage of that right now, and it launches in July 2021. I'm also working on transforming </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Tanabata Wish</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> into a graphic novel and I have another YA project I'm working on in between.</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Probably some kind of marketing. I enjoy helping my author friends come up with new promotion ideas for their books.</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">YES! My favorite library is the Southeast Regional Library in Gilbert. Thanks to COVID, I haven't been able to go inside to browse or work at one of the tables overlooking the Riparian Preserve since early March. I miss that. Also, I miss doing Drop Everything and Write Day with their teens. Every year, I round up a few of my favorite Phoenix-based YA authors (like Kara McDowell!), and we do high-level, craft-based writing workshops with the talented teen writers who frequent the SERL. I've also done workshops and panels for adult writers at the SERL, but I love working with the teens the best.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div>fujimura
Sheila GrinellSheila Grinellhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/grinell​The Contract <div class="ExternalClassEDAEA9C012E44A41965DD0A65ED40A93"><h2>​<a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/4489943" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">The Contract </span></span></a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Sheila </span><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">Grinell</span></span> <br><br></h2><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Sheila Grinell spent forty years developing science centers, most recently in Phoenix where she served as founding President and CEO of the Arizona Science Center. She turned to literature in her sixties, publishing a debut novel, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Appetite</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, in 2016. </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Contract</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, her second work of fiction, is based in part on her work as a museum consultant in Saudi Arabia. Born in a taxi in Manhattan, she studied at The Bronx High School of Science, Harvard University, and the University of California at Berkeley. She lives in Phoenix with her husband, Tom Johnson. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted me to write the book?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I had been thinking about how and when people generally learn to tolerate one another. At a colleague’s prompting, I realized I could use my  work experience in Saudi Arabia as background for a deep look at the theme. My book contrasts the habits and beliefs of a married couple of museum designers from California with those of a group of Saudis who want to create a children’s museum. Of course, the designers’ personal stories come into play. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracts me to the genre: literary fiction?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I like to read realistic, contemporary literature that makes me think. I do read in other genres, but I keep coming back to books that help me scour the insides of contemporary life. Of course, any book I read in any genre has to be well written—I love a fabulous turn of phrase.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="auto" lang="EN-US"></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are the characters based on real people?</span> <br></h3></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">All the characters are based on real people and real circumstances that I encountered in my first, long career as a museum developer in both the US and Saudi Arabia. But the characters are all amalgams of many people. They are fictitious. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did I do?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"></span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I spent forty years in the science museum field, starting museums from scratch in the US and consulting on projects abroad,  so I already knew a lot about the job my characters try to do, and the way they try to do it. I did read up on the Saudis, and I had the privilege of reviewing my manuscript with Karen Elliott House, former publisher of </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Wall Street Journa</em>l,</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> who is one of the nation’s authorities on Saudi Arabia. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Currently reading?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">At the suggestion of a friend, I’m reading </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Unwomanly Face of War</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> by Svetlana Alexievich. She won the Nobel Prize in literature for the book, which is an oral history of Russian women in World War II. Not my usual fare!</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Currently writing?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I’m working on a new novel that is set here in Arizona. It’s about contemporary pioneers in the immediate post-pandemic West. Since I’ve written only 50 pages to date, it won’t be available for another couple-three years.</span> <br><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"></span> </p><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If not writing, what would I do?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Now, I only want to write. But I’ve already done something else—a long stint as a creator of science museums—that I loved doing. Think of me the next time you visit the Arizona Science Center.</span> <br><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"></span> </p><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Local library?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">My husband and I recently moved, so now I use the Acacia Branch. Previously, my husband, son, and I used the Mesquite Branch. Now I borrow books, and before the pandemic, I browsed the aisles to see what’s new, to check out classic titles I hadn’t read before, and to sit quietly and read. I’ve been a constant library goer since third grade. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div>grinell
Shonna SlaytonShonna Slaytonhttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/slaytonSnow White's Mirror <div class="ExternalClass50B1804FCD6848129F9AD429E4292AE4"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/5033056" target="_blank">​Snow White's Mirror​</a> by Shonna Slayton<br></h2><p>​<br></p><div>Shonna Slayton is the author of the <em>Fairy-tale Inheritance</em> series of young adult novels, beginning with <em>Cinderella's Dress</em>. She edited curriculum for an education company before homeschooling her own children using literature-based whole book learning. She's taught writing using fairy tales in school classrooms and workshops, as well as in public libraries as a writer in residence. Join her reader's group and receive a free prequel story as a welcome gift when you sign up at <a href="http://shonnaslayton.com/" target="_blank">ShonnaSlayton.com</a>.  </div><h3><br></h3><h3> What prompted you to write this book?  </h3><div>Even before I started writing historical fairy tales, I’ve been wanting to write a book set in a mining town. When I got the idea for a Snow White adaptation, it seemed the perfect time to include a boomtown setting. I researched a few mining towns in Arizona and settled on Bisbee. It was great fun to weave copper mining into a story set in the early 1900s, a time when copper was becoming so important to the newly electrified world.  </div><div> <br></div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?  <br></h3><div>My historical fairy tales grew out of an idea for a Cinderella story. I was browsing the picture book section at Ironwood Library with my daughter and saw a modern-looking cover on a Cinderella book. My first impression was that it was a story about Cinderella’s dress as an heirloom being passed down through the generations. It wasn’t. But the idea stuck and merged with another idea I was playing with, and in the end, I started a series of historical fairy tales centered on inherited magical heirlooms.  </div><div> <br></div><h3>Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who?  <br></h3><div>Since I’m writing historicals, you’ll find a few famous names scattered throughout the series of books. In <em>Snow White’s Mirror</em>, specifically, you’ll find some names of early Arizonan politicians and some first names of early miners. And, in one of those Easter eggs that authors like to include, the drilling team that won the 4th of July competition that year came from the area where I grew up, so I had to put them in there!  </div><div> </div><h3>What type of research did you do to write your book?  <br></h3><div>Research is my favorite thing. I could get lost in the past if I didn’t have deadlines. When writing <em>Snow White’s Mirro</em><em>r</em>, I read every book on Bisbee I could get my hands on. My favorite was <em>Bisbee: Queen of the Copper Camps</em> by Lynn R. Bailey. The Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum has some great videos and photos on their website. I also found newspaper articles from the time and pulled information from those.  </div><div> <br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading?  <br></h3><div>You mean, book(s) plural, right? The last book I opened was <em>Titanic: The Edith Brown Story </em>by her son David Haisman. The story of a 15-yr old survivor of the Titanic sinking.  </div><div> <br></div><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?  <br></h3><div>Right now, I’m writing the last book in the Fairy-tale Inheritance series, a Little Mermaid novel set a few years after <em>Snow White’s Mirror </em>takes place. It’ll be published in April 2021.  </div><div> ​<h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do?  <br></h3></div><div>This question is too hard. (!)  <br></div><div><br></div><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there?  </h3><div>Yes! Ironwood is my local library. I tend to keep the librarians there busy pulling research books for me (bless them!). Before COVID, I’d be there a couple times a month with my teens to swap out books and pick up seeds to plant in our garden. I’ve sat in on a few workshops; my favorite was making book art.  </div><div> ​<br></div><p><br></p></div>slayton
Stella Pope DuarteStella Pope Duartehttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/duarteLet Their Spirits Dance<div class="ExternalClass7B4FF31E78FA441F9F64601086418B0D"><div><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/145033" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-charstyle="Hyperlink">Let Their Spirits Dance</span></span> </a><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><span data-ccp-parastyle="heading 4">by Stella Pope Duarte</span></span> </h2><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><br>Inspired to write by a prophetic dream of her father in 1995, Irish Latina author, Stella Pope Duarte, believes that writing, like love, begins within, or it doesn’t start at all. Hailed by critics as a “major, literary voice in America,” Duarte is described by reviewers as a “magical weaver with a sure hand and a pure heart,” and as an author who “will enlarge humanity.” Her works include: </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Fragile Night</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>; </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Let Their Spirits Dance</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>; </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>If I Die in Juarez</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>; </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Women Who Live in Coffee Shops and Other Stories</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>;</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em> Writing Through Revelations,</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Visions and Dreams: The memoir of a writer’s soul</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, and <em>R</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>aul H. Yzaguirre: Seated at the Table of Power</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. In 2020, Duarte completed the 100-year history of Phoenix College, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Our Past Your Future</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. All proceeds from the book will go to student scholarships. </span> <br></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Duarte’s literary works have won awards and honors nationwide, including a 2009 American Book Award; Southwest Book of the Year Award; Women in American History Award; nomination to ONE BOOK AZ; Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Award; Independent Publisher’s Book of the Year Award; Arizona Highways Book of the Year Award; a Book Sense 76 Selection, and the Luis Leal Award for Distinction in Chicano/Latino Literature. In 2013 Duarte was honored as one of four Women Makers of Arizona, and included as part of the PBS Special: MAKERS: Women Who Make America. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Born and raised in the Sonorita Barrio in South Phoenix, Duarte currently writes from her home in Phoenix a few miles away from the place of her birth. She credits faith and the love of family as the foundation for her literary success. </span> <br></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">“I recall walking to Harmon Library to check out books, and to the Phoenix Public Library in the downtown area. Words danced inside my head. There is creative power in children who read!” </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What prompted you to write this book?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">In my short story collection, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Fragile Night</em>,</span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"> I wrote a story "Cobra" which was about a soldier suffering the effects of the Vietnam War many years after his service. The Vietnam War was raging, as I entered college. Guys I knew in high school and college went to Vietnam, and some never came back. The war haunted me. As a counselor/educator, I had worked with people suffering PTSD, and originally thought I'd write about America's struggle to come to terms with the war. However, thanks to a Vietnam vet who encouraged me to tell a story of a soldier and his family from Phoenix, I was able to change direction and write a novel that I believe I was born to write. In fact, one of the reasons for my birth in this time period, was to write </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Let Their Spirits Dance</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. Once I decided to write this historical novel…unexplained and wondrous events evolved! The gratitude of Vietnam vets, their tears and applause were my inspiration.</span> <br></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I love history! It is through looking back, that we can get our bearings and understand where we are, and where we are going. This historical novel challenged me at all levels, but the message was clear. We carry with us our past, present and future; we are timeless life forces and to stretch even further, we are part of the invisible tapestry of the universe. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are any of the characters in your book based on real people and if so, who? </span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">My research for this novel was extensive. Many interviews were conducted across the country and in Vietnam as well. I had vowed to dedicate the book to the first soldier whose family I interviewed who had died in Vietnam. That soldier, Tony Cruz, had told his family as he left for the war, that someday he would make history, that they would read about him in a book, and that he would be famous. Tony became the inspiration for my novel, and his words are said in the novel by Jesse Ramirez at Sky Harbor Airport. Tony Cruz’s body was sent to the wrong address and in the novel Jesse Ramirez suffers the same fate, however, no other links were made directly to Tony’s life. Instead, the interviews with many vets led me to piece together, as best I could, what they had suffered in a war that became one of the most controversial and unpopular wars in American history. Their suffering was real long after the war ended.</span> <br></p></div><div><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What type of research did you do to write your book?</span> <br><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">My research involved NUMEROUS hours spent transcribing interviews I completed on Vietnam veterans and their families in the U.S. and memories of families and those who had fought for U.S. forces in Vietnam. I studied Vietnamese in order to understand some of the language before I went to Vietnam. I followed the route the Ramirez family takes to get to the Vietnam Memorial Wall in a cavalcade of cars, marking each city, and especially their entrance into D.C. I spent long hours researching from books, periodicals, newspapers, internet sources, actual letters of vets, also interviewing military experts in D.C., and watching every movie I could find on the Vietnam War and on the controversy it caused in the U.S. An “unexplained encounter” with the “guys” on the Vietnam Wall caused me to understand that they wanted this book written. Each time at the Wall, I showed them my progress. Prayer, and asking for guidance were vital in completing this novel. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">What book are you currently reading?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I read several books at a time. On hand is <em>T</em><em>he </em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Seven Storey Mountain</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, by Thomas Merton; Jean Stafford’s short story, “In the Zoo,” (part of her collection); Nathan Englander’s short story, “The Twenty-Seventh Man,” in </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>For the Relief of Unbearable Urges</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, and Annie Proulx, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>The Shipping News</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">I am writing the screenplay for </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Let Their Spirits Dance</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">; a fantasy Sci-Fi, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Once We Were Wolves</em></span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">, and a heartfelt endeavor, </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US"><em>Reflections From the Pale Blue Dot: The Mystery of Free Will</em>. </span><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">No publication dates are available. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">If you weren't a writer, what would you do?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Find another way to express my creative power. I used to sing for years, so I would probably turn to singing again, or some form of musical adventure. </span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> </span></p></div><div><h3><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Do you use your local library? If so, which library is it and what do you do there?</span> </h3><p><span data-contrast="none" lang="EN-US">Yes, I have depended on the Burton Barr location for archival information on historical issues. I’ve been able to attain very helpful and timely information that has been essential to my work. Over the years, I have checked out books for myself and my children and grandchildren at several branches. As a child, Harmon Park Library and the Phoenix Public Library were second homes for me.</span><span data-ccp-props="{"201341983":0,"335559739":160,"335559740":259}"> ​</span></p></div></div>duarte
Tina RadcliffeTina Radcliffehttps://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/services/local-authors/radcliffeFinding the Road Home<div class="ExternalClass6AA57C19F67642AFAF6E2278C63CBB2C"><h2><a href="https://phoenix.overdrive.com/phoenix-phoenixpl/content/media/4876359" target="_blank">​Finding the Road Home</a> by Tina Radcliffe<br></h2><p>​</p><p>A freelance writer for over twenty years, Tina Radcliffe is a Romance Writers of America Honor Roll member, a two-time RWA Golden Heart finalist, and four-time American Christian Fiction Writers Carol Award nominee. Besides novel-length fiction, Tina has sold over three dozen short stories to <em>Woman’s World Magazine</em>. A former registered nurse and library cataloger, Tina currently resides in Arizona, where she writes fun, heartwarming romance. </p><h3> What prompted you to write this book?  <br></h3><div>I lived in Oklahoma for 17 years and my heart is still there, so it seemed only fitting to write a book about a ranching family.  </div><div> </div><h3>What attracted you to this genre: romance, mystery, non-fiction, etc.? <br></h3><div>I love romance because we can always use a little uplifting happily-ever-after.  <br></div><div><br></div><h3>What book are you currently reading?  <br></h3><div>I’m currently reading, <em>The Lazy Genius Way </em>by Kendra Adachi  </div><div><br></div><h3>Are you writing anything now? If so, when will it come out? </h3><div><em>His Holiday Prayer-Book 3 Hearts of Oklahoma </em>releases on December 1. Book 4, as yet unnamed releases in early 2021.  </div><div> <br></div><h3>If you weren't a writer, what would you do?  <br></h3><div>I’ve already been a soldier in the US Army, an oncology RN, a library cataloger and a pharmacy clerk. This is my last career.   </div><h3><br></h3><h3>Do you use your local library?  If so, which library is it and what do you do there? </h3><div>I make a point of checking out libraries whenever I travel. Currently, I use the Maricopa libraries and Glendale Public Library. I use online resources at this time.   </div><div> ​<br></div><div><br>​<br></div><p><br></p><p><br></p></div>radcliffe